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are for better or worse, ingrained features of the american economy. since when did cutting the deficit become such a big budget priority. we'll discuss the gop's attention deficit disorder when the ranking member of the house budget committee, congressman chris van holland joins us, just ahead. >>> time for the your business entrepreneur of the week. las vegas anesthesiologist took his experience in the e.r. and created a hangover cure, using an iv-administered formula. he put it on a bus, treating suffererses up and down the strip. we're here! we're going to the park! [ gina ] oh hey, dan! i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease on
a deficit reduction plan over the longer term, starting as the economy begins to recover more that will give more credibility to the market, such that interest rates don't go up if they get scared, we'll never do anything about deficits. but it's a matter of timing, not a matter of morality. ivities bob, giving all great work that demoss is doing, the republicans have been masterful insofar as is the national debate has centered on deficits. a lot of the economists would say, look, as ezra points out, a long-term plan is necessary, but in the short term stimulus spending is what we need. >> exactly what we need. >> the elephant in the living room is still unemployment. we have too many people who are jobless or underemployed, and budgets in any kind of reasonable state of balance without putting these people back to work in good jobs so that they're paying taxes. the question becomes, when we have they budget debates in washington and the question that's not being answered is, what is the goal? the goal is not simply to get a balanced budget or get closer. it's to have some kind of economic
the sequester for the moment maybe don't do anything. the economy looks like it's picking up a little steam. and that might be just what we need. you know, in terms of the ryan budget, it took a public drubbing in the election. we, we already forgotten about november? when the republicans ran on the ryan budget. if they want to keep revisiting that, that's their choice. but why are we talking about this? we just find out that medicaid and medicare deliver health care cheaper than anything else? and they want to eviscerate that? it makes utterly no sense at all to me, anyway. >> howard, these seem to be sort of political manifestos, more than fiscal proposals. especially the ryan budget, over 40% of its savings are based on a repeal of obama care. which ain't going to happen any time soon. >> i agree, they are political. they aren't even opening negotiating positions, sometimes people set out markers that are designed to begin negotiations. these are political documents and they're speaking to their own parties. and the democrats have already said, look, you want to run on the ryan budget ag
, interest rates are extremely low right now. there's a lot of unused productive capacity in the economy. there is disagreement over whether you could continue to run the deficits. so, you know -- i don't want to say there's no disagreement. people do disagree over this, and that's the problem that washington hat right now. everyone says we have to cut, we have to cut. that's the problem with the murray budget. it goes way too far toward the republicans. if unfortunate the sharp debate that schumer is talking about, debate the progressive budget, which actually adds spending and stimulus against the ryan plan. >> we haven't cut spending, have we? seriously. can we at least try that and see whether or not all of this -- but that's not cutting spending. you're still spending the money, judd forestalling where you will make the payment. >> it's still growing. >> spending in this country is still growing. it's a contingent and sane argument to make that we need to address it from that side first. we gave you the $600 billion in new taxes, you want more, you want more spending. >> paul ryan w
here illegally is in any way skilled or would contribute to the american economy. >> to the american economy, which you know, defies our, our entire history. i mean the thing that's so stunning about the 47% comment, that comment, the if i were a mexican comment that he made -- >> the comment that if his dad had been mexican he'd have a better shot of winning this. >> when your tape came out, i was so shaken by it, i was talking about it for, it came out late in the afternoon. i kept talking about it for hours trying to wrap my head around how was it possible that a person running for president of the united states -- leave aside in public -- in private, speak that way about a country he hoped to lead. and it spoke to me anyway and clearly to you as well, that this mitt romney has, has this mindset that has him high above everyone else. in a way that made him, i think unpalatable to lots of people. and your video just was like, the boom, that's it. that's enough for me. for a lot of people. >> scott, in the fix, in the "washington post" shawn sullivan has a great analysis, it's like
by the time we came into office in 2009, it was all about the economy. but the animating event really for three years, leading up to that election, was iraq. i definitely think, i think it is, i think it will have a huge impact, it has on this commander-in-chief and will have on future commanders in chief. because they understand that without some popular support, it's hard to go about doing -- a lot of military action. without some broad popular support among people to do something like this, there's very little taste to park tens of thousands of people in a place like syria. that even though it's important, has less of a connection to folks here at home. they understand now probably more than ever, the real costs of the war. not just in dollars, but in lives and in injuries and in things like ptsd, which we'll quite frankly be dealing with for a lifetime. >> rachel i want to talk about the veterans' angle on this and we speak about the cost of war. we often forget about those still living if you're look at what's happening to veterans, there are 600,000 of veterans who have backlog
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6